The End of the Earliest Ceramic Traditions

Dnieper-Dvina Region Became Part of the Circum-Baltic Space at the Turn of the 6th to 5th Millennium BC

Authors

  • Andrey Mazurkevich State Hermitage Museum, Saint Petersburg, Russia
  • Ekaterina Dolbunova State Hermitage Museum, Saint Petersburg, Russia
  • Yolaine Maigrot UMR 8215 Trajectoires, France
  • Veronika Filippova St. Petersburg State University, Russia

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.4312/dp.49.21

Keywords:

early pottery, hunter-gatherers, Narva culture, Circum-Baltic space, bone industry

Abstract

The Dnieper-Dvina area is one of the regions in Eastern Europe which was part of a wider network of the earliest ceramic traditions, spread in the first half to the middle of the 6th millennium BC. After the collapse of this network new ceramic complexes appeared here, called the Rudnya culture, and at the end of the 6th millennium BC this manifested in changes in the directions of cultural connections. This region became part of the cultural space of the Circum-Baltic area. Several complexes within the Rudnya culture originated in different groups of Narva pottery, and are dated to c. 5400–4400 cal BC.

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Published

23.12.2022

How to Cite

Mazurkevich, A., Dolbunova, E., Maigrot, Y., & Filippova, V. (2022). The End of the Earliest Ceramic Traditions: Dnieper-Dvina Region Became Part of the Circum-Baltic Space at the Turn of the 6th to 5th Millennium BC. Documenta Praehistorica, 49, 344–362. https://doi.org/10.4312/dp.49.21

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