The life of plants under extreme CO2

Authors

  • Dominik Vodnik

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.14720/abs.50.1.16101

Keywords:

natural CO2 springs, mofettes, soil CO2 concentration, photosynthesis, respiration

Abstract

Higly elevated and fluctuating CO2 concentrations at the sites with geogenic CO2 enrichment create unique and often extreme gaseous environment for plant life. In our paper we review the knowledge on plant performance at mofette Stavešinci, which is known for very pure exhalations of CO2. The responses of root processes and those occurring in aboveground parts of the plants are presented and discussed.

The primary target of elevated CO2 at NCDS are root- and other belowground processes, while the direct effects on shoots are expected to be minor and only periodical. The successfullness of plants to cope with adverse conditions can be largely dependent on inherent adaptive mechanisms, which can, however, not be regarded specific for the response to elevated CO2. Some species, for example cockspur grass (Echinochloa crus-galli), posess various mechanisms that make them fairly tolerant to extreme mofette environment.

References

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Published

01.07.2007

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Original Research Paper

How to Cite

Vodnik, D. (2007). The life of plants under extreme CO2. Acta Biologica Slovenica, 50(1), 31-39. https://doi.org/10.14720/abs.50.1.16101

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