Wherever We Find Friends there Begins a New Life: Tagore and China

Authors

  • Jana Rošker

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.4312/as.2010.-14.1.45-56

Keywords:

Tagore in China, Chinese translations, intercultural interactions, modernization, westernization, the May 4th Movement

Abstract

Tagore made a deep impression upon the Chinese culture and society. In 1923, the Jiangxue she 講學社 (Beijing Lecture Association) invited Rabindranath Tagore to deliver a series of talks. The Jiangxue she Association was established in September 1920 and represented one of the many institutions that came to life in China during the May Fourth Movement. Since then, almost all of his works in English have been translated into Chinese. He came to China just when the latter was beginning her Renaissance and his visit certainly gave a great impetus to this new movement. His poems of Stray Birds and The Crescent Moon have created new styles of prosody in the new Chinese poetry. A Crescent Moon Society (for poetry) and a Crescent Moon magazine were started immediately after this event by Hu Shi 胡适 (Hu 2002: 90). During his visit, Tagore raised two basic questions, one about the relation between tradition and modernity, and the other about the usual identification of modernisation with Westernisation. Since the May Fourth Movement, China has also been concerned with these questions and Chinese intellectuals have come out with different answers. These questions, however, were important not only for China but for India as well. Such debates and the revaluation of various answers represented the most important condition for a consolidation of new ideologies, which formed a political basis for the changing societies of both countries.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Author Biography

  • Jana Rošker
    Jana S. Rošker, Full professor of Sinology and head of the Department of Asian and African Studies, Faculty of Arts, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.

References

Chan, Alan K. L. (2000) ‘Confucian Ethics and the Critique of Ideology.’ Asian Philosophy 10 (3), pp. 245–262.

Das, Sisir Kumar (1989) ‘The Controversial Guest: Tagore in China.’ In: Across the Himalayan Gap – An Indian Quest for Understanding China. Tan Chung and Ravni Thakur, eds. New Delhi: Gyan Publishing House. Pp. 362–390.

Duara, Prasenjit (1989) ‘The Critique of Modernity in India and China.’ In: Across the Himalayan Gap – An Indian Quest for Understanding China. Tan Chung and Ravni Thakur, eds. New Delhi: Gyan Publishing House. Pp. 131–142.

Hu, Xinhe (2002) ‘Hu Shi's Enlightenment Philosophy.’ In: Contemporary Chinese Philosophy. Nicholas Bunnin and Cheng Zhongying /Chung-ying, eds. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers. Pp. 82–101.

Mall, Ram Adhar (1996) Philosophie im Vergleich der Kulturen. Interkulturelle Philosophie - eine neue Orientierung. Darmstadt: Primus Verlag.

Meissner, Werner (1990) Philosophy and Politics in China – The Controversy over Dialectical Materialism in the 1930s. Translated by Richard Mann. London: C. Hurst & Co.

Peng, Ming and Cheng, Qian 彭明,程歉 (1999) 近代中國的思想歷程 (1840–1949) (Historical Processes of Thought in Modern China; 1840–1949). Beijing: Zhongguo Renmin daxue chuban she.

Rošker, Jana S. (2008) Searching for the Way – The Theory of Knowledge in Pre-Modern and Modern China. Hong Kong: Chinese University Press.

Said, Edward W. (1995 1978) Orientalism – Western Conceptions of the Orient. Harmondsworth, Middlesex: Penguin books.

Shen, Sampson C. (1999) ‘Tagore and China.’ In: In the Footsteps of Xuanzang: Tan Yun-Shan and India. Tan Chung, ed. New Delhi: Gyan Pub. House: Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts. Pp. 242–256.

Sun, Yixue 孙宜学 (2007) 泰戈尔来华讲演及论争 (Tagore's Talks in China and the Controversial Debates). Hefei: Anhui chuban she.

Tagore, Rabindranath (1989) ‘Talks in China, 1924 (Experts).’ In: Across the Himalayan Gap – An Indian Quest for Understanding China. Tan Chung and Ravni Thakur, eds. New Delhi: Gyan Publishing House. Pp. 63–64.

Tan, Chung (1989a) ‘Tagore’s Inspiration in Chinese New Poetry.’ In: Across the Himalayan Gap – An Indian Quest for Understanding China. Tan Chung and Ravni Thakur, eds. New Delhi: Gyan Publishing House. Pp. 391–422.

Tan, Chung (1989b) ‘A Sino Indian Perspective for India – China Understanding.’ In: Across the Himalayan Gap – An Indian Quest for Understanding China. Tan Chung and Ravni Thakur, eds. New Delhi: Gyan Publishing House. Pp. 168–173.

Tang, Xiao (2002) ‘Liang Qichao’s Political and Social Philosophy.’ In: Contemporary Chinese Philosophy. Nicholas Bunnin and Cheng Zhongying /Chung-ying, eds. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers Ltd. Pp. 17–37.

Yu, Dunkang 余敦康 (2001) 馮友蘭先生關於傳統與現代化的思考 (‘Feng Youlan's Reasoning about Tradition and Modernisation’). Zhongguo zhexue shi 1, pp. 21–28.

Downloads

Published

1. 12. 2010

How to Cite

Rošker, Jana. 2010. “Wherever We Find Friends There Begins a New Life: Tagore and China”. Asian Studies -14 (1): 45-56. https://doi.org/10.4312/as.2010.-14.1.45-56.

Similar Articles

1-10 of 270

You may also start an advanced similarity search for this article.