HOW DOES AUDITORY INFORMATION INFLUENCE OBSERVERS’ PERCEPTION DURING THE EVALUATION OF COMPLEX SKILLS?

Authors

  • Frederike Veit Faculty of Sport Science, Leipzig University, Germany

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.52165/sgj.12.2.135-145

Keywords:

common-coding, paired comparison, perceptual sensitivity, acrobatic series on floor, expert-novice paradigm

Abstract

Perceiving and gathering information from the environment are essential abilities of humans, especially in sports. An individual’s perception of aspects such as the surrounding conditions or the movements of other athletes can be decisive for a successful performance. The question that arises is whether an individual’s level of expertise affects his or her ability to use task-specific information. Furthermore, it should be determined whether the type of information that is gathered differs across people with different sport-specific experiences. The aim of the study was to investigate the role of auditory information in the observation and evaluation of complex skills in gymnastics. Participants with different amounts of experience were asked to estimate the duration of flight phases in straight-back somersaults on the floor under manipulated auditory conditions. The results of the current study show that participants with no specific experience in gymnastics performed worse than participants with visual or motor experiences. Additionally, the current gymnasts outperformed the other participants. One could speculate that current gymnasts benefit from their motor experiences, which lead to improved perceptual sensitivity and a better ability to identify differences between two cues. In conclusion, it could be enriching to take the auditory information into account in motor learning tasks.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

Abdi, H., & Williams, L. J. (2010). Tukey’s Honestly Significant Differences (HSD) Test. In N. Salkind (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Research Design (pp. 1-5). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Agostini T., Righi, G., Galmonte, A., & Brino, P. (2004). The relevance of auditory information in optimizing hammer throwers performance. In B. Pascolo (Ed.), Biomechanics and sports (pp. 67-74). Vienna, Austria: Springer.

Arkaev, L. I., & Suchilin, N. G. (2004). How to create champions. The theory and methodology of training top-class gymnasts. Oxford, UK: Meyer & Meyer Sport.

Baudry, L., Leroy, D., Thouvarecq, R., & Chollet, D. (2006). Auditory concurrent feedback benefits on the circle performed in gymnastics. Journal of Sport Sciences, 24(2), 149-156.

Effenberg, A. O. (2005). Movement sonification : Effects on perception and action. IEEE Multimedia, 12(2), 53–59.

Enoka, R.M. (2008). Neuromechanics of Human Movement (4th ed.). Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.

Eysenck, M. W., & Keane, M. T. (2010). Cognitive psychology. A student’s handbook (6th ed.). Psychology Press, Hove, East Sussex, UK.

George, G.S. (2010). Championship gymnastics: biomechanical techniques for shaping winners. Designs for Wellness Press, Carlsbad, CA.

Heinen, T., Vinken, P. M., & Velentzas, K. (2012). Judging performance in gymnastics: A matter of motor or visual Experience? Science of Gymnastics Journal, 4(1), 63–72.

Heinen, T., Koschnick, J., Schmidt-Maaß, D., & Vinken P. M. (2014). Gymnasts utilize visual and auditory information for behavioural synchronization in trampolining. Biology of Sport, 31, 223-226.

Hommel, B., (2019). Theory of event coding (TEC) V2.0: Representing and controlling perception and action. Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics 81(7), 2139-2154.

Kennel, C., Streese, L., Pizzera, A., Justen, C., Hohmann, T., & Raab, M. (2015). Auditory reafferences: the influence of real-time feedback on movement control. Movement Science and Sport Psychology, 6(69), 1-6.

Mann, D. T. Y., Williams, A. M., Ward, P., & Janelle, C. M. (2007). Perceptual-cognitive expertise in sport: A meta-analysis. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 29(4), 457-478.

Pizzera, A. (2012). Gymnastic judges benefit from their own motor experience as gymnasts. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 83(4), 603-607.

Pizzera, A., & Raab, M. (2012). Perceptual judgments of sports officials are influenced by their motor and visual experience. Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, 24(1), 59–72.

Pizzera, A., Möller, C., & Plessner, H. (2018). Gaze behavior of gymnastic judges: where do experienced judges and gymnasts look while judging? Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 89(1), 112-119.

Prassas, S., Kwon, Y.-H., Sands, W. A. (2006). Biomechanical research in artistic gymnastics: a review. Sports Biomechanics, 5(2), 261-291.

Prinz, W. (1997). Perception and action planning. European Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 9(2), 129–154.

Simi Motion ® (Version 9) [Computer software]. Munich, Germany: Simi Reality Motion Systems GmbH.

Stauffer, C. C., Haldemann, J., Troche, S. J., & Rammsayer, T. H. (2012). Auditory and visual temporal sensitivity: evidence for a hierarchical structure of modality-specific and modality-independent levels of temporal information processing. Psychological Research, 76(1), 20-31.

Ste-Marie, D. M. (1999). Expert-novice differences in gymnastic judging: An information-processing perspective. Applied Cognitive Psychology 13, 269-281.

Veit, F., & Heinen, T. (2019). The role of visual and auditory information in the observation and evaluation of complex skills in gymnastics. Journal of Physical Fitness, Medicine & Treatment in Sports, 6(2), 1-7.

Downloads

Published

2020-06-01

Issue

Section

Articles

How to Cite

HOW DOES AUDITORY INFORMATION INFLUENCE OBSERVERS’ PERCEPTION DURING THE EVALUATION OF COMPLEX SKILLS?. (2020). Science of Gymnastics Journal, 12(2), 135-145. https://doi.org/10.52165/sgj.12.2.135-145

Similar Articles

1-10 of 47

You may also start an advanced similarity search for this article.